Department of State GrowthTransport

Assessing Fitness to Drive

Medical Conditions and Driving

All Tasmanian drivers, regardless of age, have a legal responsibility to notify the Registrar of Motor Vehicles if they develop a permanent or long term medical condition likely to affect driving ability.

Just because you have a medical condition that might affect your driving DOES NOT mean that you will lose your licence.

Medical Conditions that affect driving

There are many medical conditions, or a combination of conditions, that can affect your ability to drive safely. These include (but are not limited to):

All of these conditions may affect perception, judgment and response time when driving, as well as general physical capability.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why do I need to report a medical condition that may affect my driving ability?
Do I need to report a temporary condition?
What do I do if I develop a medical condition or my existing condition changes
What happens after I have reported that I have a medical condition?
What happens to my driver licence after I report my medical condition?
What happens if my Doctor indicates that I need to undergo a driving assessment?
What happens if I lose my licence?
What do I do if I believe another driver is not safe to drive?

Why do I need to report a medical condition that may affect my driving ability?

You are legally required to notify the Registrar of Motor Vehicles if you develop a permanent or long term medical condition that may affect your driving ability.

Driving is a complex task which requires perception, appropriate judgment, adequate response time and reasonable physical capability. If you drive with a medical condition that impairs your driving ability, you are putting yourself and other road users at risk.

You may also not be covered by your insurance company if you have a crash and have not reported your condition to the Registrar.

Do I need to report a temporary condition?

Temporary disabilities (such as a broken bone) do not need to be reported, however, you must consult with your doctor about whether or not the temporary disability will impact on your driving. If so, you should refrain from driving until your injury has fully recovered.

What do I do if I develop a medical condition or my existing condition changes?

If you develop a medical condition or your existing medical condition changes you should:

  1. Talk to your doctor about whether it may affect your driving ability.
  2. If your driving ability will be affected, notify the Registrar of Motor Vehicles of your condition (or changes to your current condition). This is your legal responsibility, not your doctor's. You can do this by:

All information we receive will be kept private and confidential.

What happens after I have reported that I have a medical condition?

Just because you have reported a medical condition that might affect your driving DOES NOT mean that you will lose your licence.

As a result of your notification, you may be required to undertake a medical assessment with your doctor. You will need to return your assessment results to the Registrar of Motor Vehicles for consideration.

Your medical fitness to drive will be determined on a case by case basis in accordance with National Fitness to Drive Standards.

As part of this assessing process, you may also be required to:

  • Provide a specialist medical report
  • Undertake a driving assessment
  • Provide a report from an occupational therapy driving assessor

You are responsible for bearing the cost of any assessments undertaken. To find out whether you can claim for the cost of the consultation, contact Medicare.

What happens to my driver licence after I report my medical condition?

A medical assessment of your fitness to drive may result in:

  • Retaining your driver licence with no further action required
  • Retaining your driver licence, subject to periodic medical assessments
  • Being issued with a conditional licence (eg. Restrictions on driving at night and driving with glasses)
  • Suspension or cancellation of your licence (this is very rare - it is possible to appeal these decisions)

What happens if my Doctor indicates that I need to undergo a driving assessment?

Your treating Doctor will notify the Registrar of Motor Vehicles if he or she believes you are required to undertake a driving assessment.

A driving assessment can be undertaken by a Departmental Driving Assessor or an Occupational Therapist.  The Registrar will inform you in writing of your requirements.

What happens if I lose my licence?

Sometimes a driver licence is suspended or cancelled due to a medical condition.

If this occurs The Registrar of Motor Vehicles will notify you in writing that your driver licence is suspended or cancelled.  If your licence is suspended the Registrar of Motor Vehicles will write to you advising you what you may be required to do to have your suspension lifted.

We understand that the loss of your licence is difficult and upsetting, and may also significantly impact on your independence. Please see the Tasmanian Older Drivers' Handbook for useful information on life beyond driving.

What do I do if I believe another driver is not safe to drive?

If you become aware of a driver who you believe is not safe to drive, you should:

  1. Firstly discuss your concerns with the driver directly - it may not be an easy conversation to have, but it may help the driver to realise that they need to take action. If the driver won't discuss their driving with you, suggest they consult their doctor for an objective opinion.
  2. If you cannot speak with the driver, or the driver refuses to take action, notify the Registrar of Motor Vehicles for further investigation. You can do this by:

If writing to or emailing the Registrar, please include your name, contact details, the details of the person you are concerned about and the reasons for your concerns.

All notifications received will be treated confidentially - your details will not be disclosed to the reported driver unless you consent or it is required by law. You will also not receive any details concerning the outcome of the investigation.